Mayor Walsh Rallies for More Affordable Housing and Jobs in Boston

The “Yes on 5” rally, held at 1565 Dorchester Ave between the Collyer Field House and the Doherty-Gibson playground, was first and foremost a gathering of a community. The rally was hosted by the Yes for a Better Boston Committee, whose object is to implement a property tax surcharge to fund the Community Preservation Act (CPA). CPA is an important tool designed to help create affordable homes, better parks and playgrounds, preserve our historic neighborhood buildings, and create jobs. Before it began, attendees hugged newcomers and chatted with old friends. Various groups were in attendance, including a teacher’s union, the mass alliance of Hud tenants, and the greater Boston interfaith organization. Many people stayed after, talking with each other and taking selfies with the mayor. The rally was only marred by one man who shouted a question about health officials at the mayor in protest.

About 40 people were in attendance to hear Mayor Walsh and others talk about Question 5. Among the attendees included the chairman of the Question 5 committee, Joe Kriesberg, Mayor Marty Walsh, executive director of the All Dorchester Sports League, Candice Gartley, and the executive director of community labor united, Darlene Lombost, who spoke at the rally and emphasized the importance of working together.

Noting that the referendum (Question 5) would only get voted through if everyone voted yes, the speakers implored listeners to get involved, donate money, and get people to vote “yes.” Their goal for the proposed ballot question is to obtain affordable housing, keep Boston diverse, and preserve its historical spaces. 

Mayor Marty Walsh rationalized that people who can’t find housing will move away from Boston, which would mean the loss of hard-working individuals for the city. He informed the crowd of a Boston nonprofit that had to sell silverware that was as old as Paul Revere because of financial duress. 

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